WELCOME

Welcome to the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity

The mission of the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity is to promote the exchange of ideas across disciplines and generations.  Serving as a hub for a vibrant community of scholars from many fields with convergent interests, the Center is a forum for innovative research, graduate student mentoring, and public programming.  Reaching beyond the university, the Center is enriched by linkages with NGOs, cultural institutions, and supra-national organizations dedicated to the study and prevention of mass violence and its legacies. 

News

July 2021
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July 7, 2021
In Memoriam: Prof. Eric Weitz

It is with great sadness that I report the death on July 1, 2021 of founding Center Advisory Board member, Eric Weitz. An outstanding scholar and committed educator, Eric brought wisdom and insight to matters large and small.  He was our colleague, and he was our friend. We miss him.

We thank Eric’s wife Brigitta van Rheinberg for the following obituary. We wish her and all of Eric’s family comfort and peace.  May his memory be as a blessing. 

Debórah Dwork
Director

Eric D. Weitz

Eric David Weitz, PhD, passed away Thursday July 1 at his home in Princeton, NJ, surrounded by his family at the age of 68.

A distinguished professor of Modern European History at City College of New York, he was a frequent lecturer in public and academic settings on the history of human rights, the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, and the genocide of the Herero and Nama of Namibia. His book Weimar Germany was named an “Editor’s Choice” by The New York Times Book Review.

He was born in New York City on June 15, 1953 to Charles and Shirley Weitz, the children of Eastern European Jewish immigrants. The youngest of three brothers who remained close throughout his life, he grew up in a small home in Bayside, Queens. His father, a CPA, worked long hours while his mother took care of the family. The Bayside Jewish Center was central in their lives both socially and religiously.

The brothers attended Campy Hurley, near Woodstock, NY and it became an important part of Eric’s formative years. There he and his brothers learned about civil rights and peace, informed also by left-wing songwriters who performed there. Eric’s future academic work would continue to be rooted in the values he learned at camp and at the United Community Center in East New York, Brooklyn.

Eric married Carol Hunt Weitz in 1974 and the couple had two sons, Lev and Ben. He and Carol were married for 34 years with many happy years together.

His many written works, all published by Princeton University Press, include A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States (2019), Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy (2007); A Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation (2003), and Creating German Communism, 1890-1990: From Popular Protests to Socialist State (1997). In 2006 he initiated a book series, also published by the Press, Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity.

In 2011, Eric married Brigitta van Rheinberg, his longtime publishing editor. He enjoyed getting to know her son Sebastian and her former husband Bob, who became good friends. Eric and Brigitta traveled more in the past 10 years than many people do in a lifetime. Highlights include Cuba, Machu Pichu, Kenya, South-Africa, China, Japan, and a wonderful trip to Switzerland with the entire extended family. There were also many trips to Germany and the couple spent much time in Aachen, where Eric came to know and cherish Brigitta’s family and friends, and in Berlin with their dear friend Hanna Schissler.

Eric is survived by his wife Brigitta van Rheinberg; his sons Benjamin and Lev Weitz (Doha Mekki); his granddaughter Dhalia; his step-son Sebastian Zahler; his brothers Mark Weitz (Carol Weitz) and Alan Weitz (Linda Cohen); and his niece Grace.

A private funeral service will be held at Princeton Cemetery.


May 20, 2021
On the Tenth Day of the Gaza War

As scholars of Jewish Studies, the Holocaust, genocide, and human rights, we study and teach about a wide range of processes and cases of mass atrocities and state violence, and we unequivocally support the right of Israelis and of Palestinians to exist in peace. 

We also have a responsibility to center the voices and perspectives of victims and survivors of state violence.  We see that Israel commits state violence, and we must not remain silent about it. Indeed, we teach students about the dangers of remaining silent and about the importance of speaking up and taking action. This is particularly significant in this case, as Palestinians, their history, and the ongoing Israeli state violence against them since the Nakba in 1948 have been marginalized in our fields. 

We write as 3350 Hamas rockets into Israel have (to date) killed 12 people, including 2 children and the overwhelming Israeli retaliation on Gaza has (to date) killed 217 people, including 63 children, injured 1500, displaced 52,000 people, destroyed international media headquarters in Gaza as well as another 132 buildings, and smashed infrastructure crucial to daily life. Israel has launched at least 1450 airstrikes on Gaza; in just one night 62 Israeli fighter jets dropped 110 bombs on the Strip.  

We deplore the violence on both sides. The violence perpetrated by Hamas is a predictable reaction to decades of oppression and subordination of Palestinians, but this does not justify attacks on civilian populations.

The violence must cease, and better conditions must ensue to secure Palestinians’ rights equal to those of all Israelis.

We therefore call on governments, the United Nations, the European Union, and the International Criminal Court to:

(1) Work to protect Palestinians in Israel, under Israeli occupation in the West Bank and in East Jerusalem, and in Gaza now and in the future. 

(2) End support for Israeli military aggression. 

(3) Hold accountable all those responsible for documented war crimes and human rights violations. 

(4) Protect the freedom of the press by mounting an independent investigation into the Israeli airstrike that targeted and destroyed a Gaza City building housing the AP, broadcaster Al-Jazeera, and other media.

Debórah Dwork, Center Director

Center Advisory Board:

Elissa Bemporad, Ungar Chair in East European Jewish History and the Holocaust, Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Francesca Bregoli, Joseph and Oro Halegua Chair in Greek and Sephardic Jewish Studies, Associate Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Dagmar Herzog, Distinguished Professor of History, Graduate Center-CUNY

Benjamin Carter Hett, Professor, Department of History, Hunter College and Graduate Center-CUNY

Eli Karetny, Deputy Director, Ralph Bunche Institute 

Steven Remy, Professor, Department of History, Brooklyn College and History Program, Graduate Center-CUNY

Victoria Sanford, Professor of Anthropology, Lehman College; Founding Director, Center for Human Rights & Peace Studies; Doctoral Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Center-CUNY

John Torpey, Presidential Professor of Sociology and History, Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, Graduate Center-CUNY

Eric Weitz, Distinguished Professor of History, City College and Graduate Center-CUNY


New work by Debórah Dwork

A new publication by Center founding Director, Debórah Dwork, is out in a special issue of Holocaust Studies: A Journal of Culture and History.  Titled “Buried Words: Sexuality, Violence and Holocaust Testimonies,” this special issue tackles a long-taboo subject.  Dwork’s article examines the “silence [that] has shrouded the experience of sexual abuse of and sexual barter by Jewish adolescent boys during the Holocaust.”  Her piece analyzes Nate Leipciger’s memoir, The Weight of Freedom, which “offers a rare window onto a phenomenon singularly absent from young Jewish males’ narratives and scholarship about their lives.” And, widening her lens, Dwork “reflects upon the silence — survivors’ silence and scholars’ silence — around these interactions, examining the prompts for it and shifting interpretations over time.” 

Holocaust Studies: A Journal of Culture and History is published by Taylor & Francis


May 6, 2021
Statement in Protest Against Violence in Colombia

As a doctoral student at the GC-CUNY who offers administrative support to the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity, I vehemently condemn Colombia’s governmental actions against civilians who protest measures that harm the most vulnerable in the midst of the COVID19 pandemic. NGOs and activists have reported physical violence, arbitrary detentions, sexual violence, and 37 murders at the hands of Colombia’s National Police. 

I call on President Duque to stop incentivizing police violence against protesters, renounce his announced intention to declare a state of internal disturbance, and lift the current ban on social media and internet access. I call on President Duque to convene different sectors of society to discuss ways to stop the violence. 

And I call on all persons of good will to pay close attention to the situation in Colombia and to increase international pressure on its government. Through your solidarity, the eyes of the world will be on Colombia, deterring President Duque’s government from committing atrocities and violating human rights.

Juan Acevedo, Doctoral Student

Debórah Dwork, Center Director

Center Advisory Board:

Elissa Bemporad, Ungar Chair in East European Jewish History and the Holocaust, Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Francesca Bregoli, Joseph and Oro Halegua Chair in Greek and Sephardic Jewish Studies, Associate Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Dagmar Herzog,Distinguished Professor of History, Graduate Center-CUNY

Benjamin Carter Hett, Professor, Department of History, Hunter College and Graduate Center-CUNY.

Eli Karetny, Deputy Director, Ralph Bunche Institute 

Zachariah Mampilly, Marxe Endowed Chair of International Affairs at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, CUNY.

Steven Remy, Professor, Department of History, Brooklyn College and History Program, Graduate Center-CUNY

Victoria Sanford, Professor of Anthropology, Lehman College; Founding Director, Center for Human Rights & Peace Studies; Doctoral Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Center-CUNY

John Torpey, Presidential Professor of Sociology and History, Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, Graduate Center-CUNY

Eric Weitz, Distinguished Professor of History, City College and Graduate Center-CUNY


February 25, 2021

Statement in Support of Scholars of the Holocaust in Poland

The Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity (The Graduate Center—City University of New York) protests the pressure exerted by Polish state institutions on scholars of the Holocaust, and the concerted campaign against Professors Barbara Engelking and Jan Grabowski in particular. As scholars, we stand in solidarity with these historians of the Holocaust and their meticulous efforts to determine and report objective historical truth. We expect that Poland’s institutions of justice will show their independence from political influence, and that the government of Poland will, like other democratic countries, demonstrate its courage and continued self-confident commitment to creating an environment in which internationally respected scholars can pursue their research without fear of retribution.

Debórah Dwork, Center Director

Center Advisory Board:

Elissa Bemporad, Ungar Chair in East European Jewish History and the Holocaust, Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Francesca Bregoli, Joseph and Oro Halegua Chair in Greek and Sephardic Jewish Studies, Associate Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY

Dagmar Herzog,Distinguished Professor of History, Graduate Center-CUNY

Benjamin Carter Hett, Professor, Department of History, Hunter College and Graduate Center-CUNY.

Eli Karetny, Deputy Director, Ralph Bunche Institute 

Zachariah Mampilly, Marxe Endowed Chair of International Affairs at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, CUNY.

Steven Remy, Professor, Department of History, Brooklyn College and History Program, Graduate Center-CUNY

Victoria Sanford, Professor of Anthropology, Lehman College; Founding Director, Center for Human Rights & Peace Studies; Doctoral Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Center-CUNY

John Torpey, Presidential Professor of Sociology and History, Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, Graduate Center-CUNY

Eric Weitz, Distinguished Professor of History, City College and Graduate Center-CUNY


As I See It: by Center Advisory Board Members

Victoria Sanford, Barriozona
“Central America Needs a Regional Commission to Prosecute Corruption”


Elissa Bemporad, Alon Confino, and Derek Penslar, Forward
“A New Declaration Aims to Fight Antisemitism Without Curtailing Free Speech”

https://forward.com/opinion/466509/a-new-declaration-aims-to-fight-antisemitism-without-curtailing-free/

Antisemitism is on the rise, with powerful instigators behind it, but the struggle against it is at risk of being derailed by acrimonious divisions among Jews and others over its very meaning. The drive for adoption of a single, fixed definition of antisemitism has devolved into a polemical political debate on Israel and Palestine with crucial free-speech implications.

Today we introduce the Jerusalem Declaration on Antisemitism, which was crafted by a group of scholars from the United States, Israel, Europe and the U.K, after more than a year of intense discussion and study. The declaration has been endorsed by 200 eminent scholars with a wide spectrum of political views. All of us agree on the need for a guide to effectively combat antisemitism that protects space for an open debate around all possibilities around the future for Israelis and Palestinians.


Ben Carter Hett, Los Angeles Times
Op-Ed: The Trump insurrection was America’s Beer Hall Putsch

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2021-01-16/donald-trump-insurrection-capitol-beer-hall-putsch

Very soon after the nation watched in horror as a mob ransacked the U.S. Capitol, journalists and politicians began speaking of a coup.

The fallout from these events has been dramatic and will continue. But we need to understand a crucial point. The guy in the Viking hat and his friends could break windows. A member of the mob could kill a police officer. Rioters could plot to assault members of Congress. All of this is terrifying. But these people and their criminal actions are not the most dangerous threat to our democracy. The real threat comes from people in business suits or police uniforms who are inside the system — and that threat remains.

A historical example illustrates the point.


Ben Carter Hett, Los Angeles Times
“Op-Ed: What the bunker mentality really means” 

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2020-11-15/donald-trump-election-delusions-autocrats

In the last week, a mash-up of a scene from “Downfall,” the movie about Hitler’s last days, has been circulating on social media. The scene is the one where Hitler bursts into an operatic rage when his officers tell him of a failed attempt to drive the Russians from Berlin. In the mash-up, Hitler is getting a different kind of bad news: All the votes are going to be counted and he will lose the election.

Donald Trump isn’t a dictator. He won office in a free and fair election and will leave it through the same democratic process. But there is a serious point underneath the mash-up comedy. Refusal to accept unpleasant reality is the hallmark of dictators, especially if disaster or defeat is looming. From his bunker, Hitler ordered imaginary armies to fight fantastical battles. Somehow, he thought, victory could be snatched from certain defeat.


Ben Carter Hett, Los Angeles Times
“What Do We Do With Trump’s Lackeys and Enablers Now?”

In 1954, Eugen Kogon worried that the “the silent gradual, creeping, unstoppable return” of the ex-Nazis seemed to be the “fate” of Germany’s new democracy. Kogon, a Christian socialist intellectual who had been imprisoned in concentration camps, was not alone in his concern. For years after the 1949 founding of West Germany, liberal-minded Germans worried the transition to democracy would end with a rebound to authoritarianism. No one would ever think it’s easy, making the transition from dictatorship to democracy. Especially when the dictatorship has been a particularly brutal and murderous one. But for Kogon, and others yearning for democracy, a basic problem presented itself. What do you do with the people who ran the old regime? And what do you do with the masses of the old regime’s followers? Aren’t they all waiting for restoration—and maybe not just waiting, but actively working toward it?

At the end of the Trump era, we face a similar question. Trump’s post-election attempt to subvert democracy was no surprise. And the raiding of the Capitol was the sort of uncomfortable shock we knew might occur. It was, as I’ve written, our Beer Hall Putsch. This makes aggressive punishments for those involved an obvious need. If we do not do this, our democracy could spiral into dictatorship. Especially insidious has been the Republican Party’s reluctance to stop Trump, even after this attempted coup. Hundreds of Congress members still voted to overturn the election and against impeaching the insurrectionist-in-chief. The lesson is clear: One political party is committed to authoritarianism. We need a harsh reckoning now with those who directly supported the coup attempt.

Board

Director

Debórah
Dwork


Director, Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity, Graduate Center-CUNY


Areas: Holocaust history: specific focus on the history of the targeted Jews before, during, and after the Nazi years; their neighbors; and Jews and non-Jews engaged in rescue 


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Debórah Dwork is the founding Director of the Center for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity at the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, Graduate Center — CUNY. Pathbreaking in her early oral recording of Holocaust survivors, Dwork weaves their narratives into the history she writes. Her award-winning books include Children With A Star; Flight from the Reich; Auschwitz; and Holocaust. Dwork is also a leading authority on university education in this field: she envisioned and actualized the first doctoral program specifically in Holocaust History and Genocide Studies. Recipient of the International Network of Genocide Scholars Lifetime Achievement Award (2020), Debórah Dwork was honored to serve as Senior Scholar-in-Residence at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and as a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and an ACLS Fellow. 


Advisory Board

Elissa
Bemporad 


Ungar Chair in East European Jewish History and the Holocaust, Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2025


Areas: Jews of Russia and Eastern Europe in modern times; Mass Violence, Gender, and Trauma, Antisemitism and Jewish responses to (and involvement in) violence under the Soviet regime.


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Elissa Bemporad holds the Ungar Chair in East European Jewish History and the Holocaust. Currently, Dr. Bemporad is Professor, Department of History at Queens College and the CUNY Graduate Center. She is a two-time winner of the National Jewish Book Award and author of Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk (2013), and Legacy of Blood: Jews, Pogroms, and Ritual Murder in the Lands of the Soviets (2019). She is also the co-editor of two volumes: Women and Genocide: Survivors, Victims, Perpetrators (2018); and Pogroms: A Documentary History (Oxford University Press, 2021) and serves as editor of Jewish Social Studies. Elissa is currently finishing the first volume of the Comprehensive History of Soviet Jewry (forthcoming with NYU Press), and is at work on a biography of Ester Frumkin.



 

Francesca
Bregoli


Joseph and Oro Halegua Chair in Greek and Sephardic Jewish Studies, Associate Professor, Department of History, Queens College, and Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2023


Areas: Early Modern Jewish history, Sephardic history, 18th-century Cultural History


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Francesca Bregoli is the Joseph and Oro Halegua Chair in Greek and Sephardic Jewish Studies, and an Associate Professor at Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY. Her research concentrates on early modern Sephardic and Italian Jewish history. She is the author of Mediterranean Enlightenment: Livornese JewsTuscan Culture, and Eighteenth-Century Reform (2014), and co-editor of Connecting Histories: Jews and their Others in Early Modern Europe (2019) and Italian Jewish Networks from the Seventeenth to the Twentieth Centuries: Bridging Europe and the Mediterranean (2018). She currently serves as director of the Center for Jewish Studies at The Graduate Center.  


Dagmar
Herzog 

Distinguished Professor of History, Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2024


Areas: Modern Europe; Histories of Sexuality and Gender; Holocaust memory: History of Religion, Jewish-Christian relations; Histories of Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis; History of Disability


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Dagmar Herzog is Distinguished Professor at the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her books include: Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany (2005), Sexuality in Europe: A Twentieth-Century History (2011), Cold War Freud: Psychoanalysis in an Age of Catastrophes (2017), and Unlearning Eugenics: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Disability in Post-Nazi Europe (2018). Coedited with Chelsea Schields, the Routledge Companion to Sexuality and Colonialism will appear in 2021. Herzog is currently writing on the theology and politics of disability in twentieth-century Germany: In the Disability Murders Archive.  


Benjamin Carter Hett 


Professor, Department of History, Hunter College and Graduate Center-CUNY.


Term: 2020-2025


Areas: 20th Century Germany and Europe; the Second World War and its aftermath; Intelligence History


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 Benjamin Carter Hett is a Professor at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center. He is the author of The Nazi Menace: Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and the Road to War, named an editors’ choice by the New York Times Book Review, and The Death of Democracy: Hitler’s Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic, winner of the 2019 Vine Award for History and named one of the year’s best books by The Times of London and the Daily Telegraph. His other books include Burning the Reichstag and Crossing Hitler, which was filmed for the BBC. Dr. Hett has been a recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies. 


Eli 
Karetny 


Deputy Director, Ralph Bunche Institute 


Term: 2020-2025


Areas: Mass Atrocity Prevention; Indigenous Movements; Transformations in sovereignty, History of Zionism; and the struggles of the Negev Bedouin. 


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Eli Karetny is the Ralph Bunche Institute’s deputy director and serves as the head of programs and operations. He manages the Institute’s human rights research projects and is in charge of donor relations, grants and financial management. After receiving a JD/MBA from Temple University, Eli served in the Peace Corps in Ukraine, then received a master’s degree in International Relations at New York University before completing his PhD in Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center under Corey Robin. His dissertation explored the pre-modern, monarchic and imperialistic themes in the work of Leo Strauss. Eli teaches political theory and international relations at Baruch College-CUNY and lives in Cold Spring, NY with his wife Taly, daughter Nomie and son Ma’ayan. 


Zachariah
Mampilly 


Marxe Endowed Chair of International Affairs at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, CUNY.


Term: 2020-2023


Areas: Political Violence; Social Movements; International Affairs, Race and Ethnicity; Africa, and South Asia 


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Zachariah Mampilly is the Marxe Endowed Chair of International Affairs at the Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, CUNY. Previously, he was Professor in the department of Political Science and Director of the Africana Studies Program at Vassar College. In 2012/2013, he was a Fulbright Visiting Professor at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. He is the author of Rebel Rulers: Insurgent Governance and Civilian Life during War  (Cornell U. Press 2011) and with Adam Branch, Africa Uprising: Popular Protest and Political Change (African Arguments, Zed Press 2015). He is the coeditor of Rebel Governance in Civil Wars  (Cambridge U. Press 2015) with Ana Arjona and Nelson Kasfir; and Peacemaking: From Practice to Theory (Praeger 2011) with Andrea Bartoli and Susan Allen Nan.  


Steven
Remy 


Professor, Department of History, Brooklyn College and History Program, Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2025


Areas: Modern European and German History; the Politics of Memory; War Crimes; Imperialism and Colonial Wars


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Steven P. Remy is a scholar of modern European and German history, with particular interests in the politics of memory, Nazi Germany and the postwar occupation, war crimes, and armed conflict in imperial spaces. He is the author of The Malmedy Massacre: The War Crimes Trial Controversy (Harvard, 2017), The Heidelberg Myth: The Nazification and Denazification of a German University (Harvard, 2003), and the forthcoming Adolf Hitler: A Reference Guide to His Life and Works (Rowman & Littlefield). He is currently writing a global history of war crimes. He has taught at Brooklyn College and the CUNY Graduate Center since 2003.  


Victoria
Sanford 


Professor of Anthropology, Lehman College; Founding Director, Center for Human Rights & Peace Studies; Doctoral Faculty, Department of Anthropology, Graduate Center-CUNY 


Term: 2020-2025


Areas: Genocide; Feminicide; Displacement; Human Rights; Indigenous Rights to Ancestral Lands; Child Soldiers; Gangs; Organized Crime; Police in Post-Conflict Societies; Guatemala, and Colombia. 


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Victoria Sanford is Professor and chair of the anthropology department and founding director of the Center for Human Rights and Peace Studies at Lehman College.  She is anthropology doctoral faculty at the Graduate Center, CUNY.  Dr. Sanford authored of Buried Secrets: Truth and Human Rights in Guatemala (2003), Violencia y Genocidio en Guatemala (2003), Guatemala: Del Genocidio al Feminicidio (2008), La Masacre de Panzos: Etnicidad, Tierra y Violencia en Guatemala (2009), co-author of the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation’s report to the Commission for Historical Clarification and co-editor of several publications. She recently won the University of California Press Public Anthropology competition for her latest book project –The Surge~Central American Border Crossings in the United States, 1980-2015. She is currently completing Bittersweet Justice: Feminicide, Impunity & Courts of Last Resort. She is recipient of many awards including the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, MacArthur Consortium Fellowship among others. 


John
Torpey 


Presidential Professor of Sociology and History, Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2023


Areas: Comparative Historical Sociology; Political Sociology 


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John Torpey is Presidential Professor – Departments of Sociology and History and Director of the Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center.  He has written or edited a number of books, including The Invention of the Passport: Surveillance, Citizenship, and the State (1999; 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 2018); Making Whole What Has Been Smashed: On Reparations Politics (Harvard University Press, 2005; rev. ed. Rutgers University Press, 2017); and Intellectuals, Socialism, and Dissent: The East German Opposition and its Legacy (University of Minnesota Press, 1995).  His current research concerns the consequences of the tech revolution for social inequality and a comparison of the social aspects of the 2020 coronavirus pandemic with those of the flu pandemic of 1918-1919.  


Eric
Weitz


Distinguished Professor of History, City College and Graduate Center-CUNY


Term: 2020-2023


Areas: Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity; Modern German History; Modern European and Global History; Social and Labor History 


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Eric D. Weitz is a Distinguished Professor – Department of History at City College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. His most recent book is, A World Divided: The Global Struggle for Human Rights in the Age of Nation-States (Princeton University Press, 2019). His other major publications include Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy (2007; Weimar Centennial (third) edition 2018), A Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation (2003; reprint with new foreword 2014), and Creating German Communism, 1890-1990: From Popular Protests to Socialist State (1997), all with Princeton University Press. Weimar Germany was named an “Editor’s Choice” by The New York Times Book Review. Weitz also edits a book series for Princeton, Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity. He lectures widely in public and academic settings on human rights, Weimar Germany, and comparative genocides. 


Menorah Signet Ring, Caption: Courtesy of Museum Augusta Raurica, Augst.

People

Affiliated Scholars

Mustafa Bayoumi


Professor, Department of English, Brooklyn College 


Areas: Postcolonial Literature and Theory; Muslim American Studies, Ethnic Studies, Race Studies, Middle Eastern Studies; Migration Studies, Journalism, Literary Theory. 


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Moustafa Bayoumi is Professor of the English Department at Brooklyn College, CUNY. He is the author of the critically acclaimed How Does It Feel To Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America (Penguin), which won an American Book Award and the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction, and of This Muslim American Life: Dispatches from the War on Terror, which was chosen as a Best Book of 2015 by The Progressive magazine and was also awarded the Arab American Book Award for Non-Fiction. A frequent contributor to The Guardian, Bayoumi has also written for the New York Times, New York magazine, The Nation, CNN.com, the London Review of Books, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and many other places.  


blustein

Jeffrey
Blustein 


Arthur Zitrin Professor, Department of Philosophy, City College


Areas: Moral Psychology, with particular emphasis on blame, forgiveness, and the emotions; Memory Studies, with a focus on the ethics of memory and memorialization, and the nature of collective remembering; and Biomedical Ethics. 


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Jeffrey Blustein received his Ph.D. at Harvard University. He is currently Arthur Zitrin Professor of the department of Philosophy at City College, following many years as a clinical bioethicist at Montefiore Medical Center and Albert College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York. His other major area of specialization is the ethics of memory and memorialization, and he has published two books on the subject, The Moral Demands of Memory (Cambridge, 2008), and Forgiveness and Remembrance (Oxford, 2014). The second edition of his popular Handbook for Health Care Ethics Committees, co-authored with Linda Farber Post, is due out from Johns Hopkins Press later this year.   


Laura B.
Cohen


Executive Director, The Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center Queensborough Community College, CUNY


Areas: Holocaust, Genocide and Atrocity Site Memorials and Museums; Transitional Justice and Memorialization; Dark Tourism; Critical Genocide Studies; and Human Rights Education

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Laura B. Cohen, Ph.D., is the Executive Director of the Harriet and Kenneth Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC) at Queensborough Community College—CUNY. Dr. Cohen received her doctorate from Rutgers University’s Division of Global Affairs where she researched the intersection of transitional justice and contested narratives at the Srebrenica Genocide Memorial in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Her analysis builds upon her extensive fieldwork in the Balkans and at atrocity site memorials in Germany, Poland, Cambodia, and Rwanda. Her chapter about the Srebrenica Memorial was published in the edited volume, Understanding Atrocities: Remembering, Representing and Teaching Genocide (University of Calgary Press, 2017) and she has lectured widely about memorialization, transitional justice, and genocide education. Dr. Cohen also holds an M.S. from New York University’s Center of Global Affairs and an M.A. in Media Studies from The New School.


Sarah
Danielsson


Professor of History, Queensborough and Executive Director of CUNY Academy, Graduate Center-CUNY 


Areas: Genocide and Nationalism


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Sarah K. Danielsson is Professor of the Department of History. She has published monographs and edited volumes on intellectual history, histories of mass violence and genocide. Her research and teaching interests include, modern European intellectual history, genocide and human rights, history of geography/historical geography, modern central Europe, trans-national history, history of ideas, history of nationalism and the nation-states. Professor Danielsson has organized a number of conferences and lectures and has received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the DAAD, among others. She is currently researching nineteenth century demographic theory and policy, and its relationship to genocide.  


Mikhal
Dekel 


Department of English, CCNY


Areas: Memory Studies; Migration Studies; Holocaust Studies; Historical Memoir; Trauma & Visual Culture; Law and Literature


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Mikhal Dekel is Professor of the English Department at the CUNY Graduate Center and the City College of New York where she teaches comparative Literature and Middle East Studies and also directs the Rifkind Center for the Humanities and Arts. She is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mellon Foundation and the Lady Davis Foundation, among others. She is the author of Tehran Children: A Holocaust Refugee OdysseyThe Universal Jew: Modernity, Masculinity and the Zionist Moment; and the Hebrew monograph Oedipus in KishinevTehran Children was finalist for the Sami Rohr Prize, the Chautauqua Prize and the National Jewish Book Awards. It has been featured in the New York Times, The Guardian the BBC, C-Span, Journal of Foreign Policy, Jewish Review of Books, among other venues.  


Tanya
Domi 


Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University 


Areas: Human rights in Post-Soviet and Post-Yugoslav states; Women in Politics and Media freedoms in Transitional Democracies; Foreign Policies of Post-Soviet and Post-Yugoslav states and consequences of war trauma on post-conflict states. 


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Tanya Domi is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University and a faculty affiliate of the Harriman Institute where she teaches human rights and international affairs in the Western Balkans. Prior to joining the faculty in 2008, Domi worked for the late Congressman Frank X. McCloskey, serving as his defense policy analyst in the early 1990s during the run-up to the Bosnian war. Domi served in the OSCE Mission to Bosnia and Herzegovina 1996-2000 as Spokesperson, Counselor to the Head of Mission and Chair of the OSCE Media Experts Commission. Domi has worked in a dozen countries, including Kosovo, Montenegro and Serbia in the Balkans. The focus of her work has been democratic, economic, media and political transitional development, as well as human rights and gender/sexual identity issues. Domi is a widely published author and is currently writing a book on the LGBTI human rights movement in the Western Balkans.  


Marcia
Esparza 


Professor, Department of Criminal Justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York.


Areas: State Crimes; Genocide, Criminology, Memory-silence; Aftermath; Postcolonial; Military Museums; Critical Military Studies, Memory Museums; Human Rights; Resistance; Prisons; Visual Sociology, immigration; Indigeneity. 


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Marcia Esparza is a Professor at the John Jay College, CUNY. She grew up in Chile during General Augusto Pinochet Ugarte dictatorship (1973-1990). She has been a field researcher for the UN’s sponsored Historical Clarification Commission (1997-1999) in Guatemala. She is the recipient of fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). She is the co-editor of: Transitional Justice: a Janus-Faced Paradigm; Remembering the Rescuers of Victims of Human Rights Crimes in Latin America and State Violence and Genocide in Latin America: The Cold War Years. She is the author of Silenced Communities: Militarization and Militarism in a Rural Guatemalan Town, and serves as a member of the International Network of Genocide Scholars, INOGS, and International Association of Genocide Scholars, IAGS. She was the co-editor for the Journal of Genocide Research (2017-2019). Since 2016, she has been analyzing military museums in the Baleares Island, Spain for her book, Sediments of Empire.  


Jessica
Lang 


Interim Dean, Weissman School of Arts and Sciences, Baruch College 


Areas: Twentieth and twenty-first century Holocaust literature and Jewish and Jewish-American literature


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Jessica Lang is a Professor in the English Department and in the Jewish Studies program at Baruch College, CUNY. She is the founding William Newman Co-Director of the Wasserman Jewish Studies Center and is currently serving as the Interim Dean of the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. She has written widely on the Holocaust from primary eyewitness accounts and in second and third generation accounts in memoirs, novels, graphic works, short stories, and poems. Her book Textual Silence: Unreadability and the Holocaust (Rutgers, 2017) challenges the ways in which readers read and process the Holocaust. She has also published in the area of contemporary Jewish-American letters. Most recently she co-edited Off the Derech: Leaving Orthodox Judaism, a collection of scholarly essays and narrative accounts considering leave-taking from a strictly religious (Jewish) upbringing. She lives in Manhattan with her family.  


Philip
Napoli 


Associate Professor, Chair, Department of History, Brooklyn College


Areas: Post-traumatic Stress, Resilience, and Veterans Studies 


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Dr. Philip Napoli is an Associate Professor and chair of the Brooklyn College Department of History. He completed his graduate work in 1998 at Columbia University. His book Bringing It All Back Home: An Oral History of New York City’s Vietnam Veterans was published in 2013. His current manuscript, More Than Our Own Pain: John Rowan and Vietnam Veterans of America will be published by the University of Massachusetts Press in 2023.  



Kosal
Path


Associate Professor and Graduate Deputy, Department of
Political Science, Brooklyn College


Areas: International relations in Southeast Asia; Vietnam’s modern history; Cambodian genocide and nationalism; transitional justice


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Dr. Kosal Path is an associate professor of political science at Brooklyn College. He was a researcher for Yale University’s Cambodian Genocide Program from 1995 to 1999. He served as deputy director of the Phnom Penh-based Documentation Center of Cambodia from 1997 to 2000. He was a research fellow at the Shoah Foundation Institute at the University of Southern California in 2012. At Brooklyn College, he teaches international relations theories, the politics of genocide and ethnic cleansing, and human rights in world politics. His research interests include thought reform and political indoctrination during the Democratic Kampuchea regime, post-genocide transitional justice, and international relations in Southeast Asia. He is the author of Vietnam’s Strategic Thinking during the Third Indochina War (University of Wisconsin Press, 2020).


Jill
Rosenthal


Assistant Professor, Department of History, Hunter College, CUNY


Areas:  History of Migration, Identity, Violence, and International Aid in the African Great Lakes region


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Dr. Jill Rosenthal is an Assistant Professor of the department of History at Hunter College, CUNY. Her research examines the history of migration, identity, violence, and international aid in the African Great Lakes region—with a specific focus on the legacy of colonial borders and illicit migration (often termed “refugee” flows). Her book manuscript, From Migrants to Refugees: Humanitarian Aid, Nationalism, and Rwandan Refugees in Ngara District, Tanzania, argue that transnational aid to Rwandan refugees unfolded as part of a broader project of nation state formation and regulation–one which deeply affected regional narratives of community and belonging.  Her research and teaching focus on violent processes of identity construction during and following the colonial time period.  She is particularly interested in analyzing the etiology of mass violence across different time periods and geographical spaces. 

Danielle A.
Zach 


Frances S. Patai Postdoctoral Fellow in Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Studies at the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences of The City College of New York (CCNY)


Areas: Armed Conflict; Transnational Radicalism; Migration; Diaspora Politics; Human Rights; Transitional Justice; International Peace and Security; Global Governance 


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Danielle A. Zach is Frances S. Patai Postdoctoral Fellow in Holocaust, Genocide, and Human Rights Studies at the Department of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences. Her courses encompass such themes as armed conflict, mass atrocity crimes, and forced migration. She is the host of the podcast Rights Talk at CCNY Downtown, co-organizer of CCNY’s Human Rights Forum, and chair of CCNY’s Critical Perspectives on Human Rights Conference. For more than a decade, Dr. Zach was a Research Fellow at The CUNY Graduate Center’s Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies, where she worked on issues pertaining to the United Nations, especially concerning international peace and security. She was previously Assistant Professor at the Political Science Department of Adelphi University, and Visiting Scholar of Irish Studies at NYU.